Although there had been exceptions like the outlandish Ford V8 specials created by the Romanians for the 1936 Monte Carlo Rally, rallies before World War II had tended to be for standard or near-standard production cars, a rule supported by manufacturers because it created a relatively even playing field. After the war, most competing cars were production saloons or sports cars, with only minor modifications to improve performance, handling, braking and suspension. This kept costs down and allowed many more people to afford the sport using ordinary family cars, so entry lists grew into the hundreds.
Rising investor confidence also indicates a rally, and it is perhaps more powerful than any economic indicator because when investors believe something is going to happen (a rally, for example), they tend to take action (purchasing shares in order to profit from expected price increases) that actually turn expectations into reality. Although it is an objective concept, investor sentiment shows through in mathematical measurements such as the put/call ratio, the advance/decline line, IPO activity, and the amount of outstanding margin debt.
Starting in 2011, rules for WRC cars changed to be more restrictive. Now regulations were derived from Super 2000 cars with a different aerodynamic kit. The cars were smaller models (there was no longer a minimum 4m length), with a 1600 cm3 direct injection turbo-charged engine with a 33 mm diameter air restrictor and a maximum pressure of 2.5 bar absolute (this will limit torque to about 400 N.m or less[6]).
With victory in the Safari Rally in 2002, McRae made the record books as the driver with most event wins in the World Rally Championship. His record has since been broken by Carlos Sainz, Sébastien Loeb and Marcus Grönholm. McRae's contract with Ford came to an end following the 2002 season, and after reportedly asking for wages of five million pounds a year, Ford decided against renewing the contract, reluctant to commit such a high amount of their budget to a driver's salary. The two parties split on amicable terms, with Ford's European director of motorsport Martin Whitaker stating "On behalf of all of us at Ford Motor Company I would like to publicly thank Colin and Nicky for their efforts during the past four years with the Ford team. I wish them both well in the future."[15] McRae said of his time with Ford "It's been a very successful four years, we've achieved a lot of very good results and I'm quite happy that myself and Ford have had a very successful partnership."[16]
The RAC Rally had formally become an International event in 1951, but Britain's laws precluded the closure of public highways for special stages. This meant it had to rely on short manoeuvrability tests, regularity sections and night map-reading navigation to find a winner, which made it unattractive to foreign crews. In 1961, Jack Kemsley was able to persuade the Forestry Commission to open their many hundreds of miles of well surfaced and sinuous gravel roads, and the event was transformed into one of the most demanding and popular in the calendar, by 1983 having over 600 miles (970 km) of stage.[47] It is now called Rally GB.
On 27 September 2008 the Colin McRae Forest Stages Rally took place in Perth, Scotland. An enhanced entry list of several former big name rally drivers took part in memory of Colin.[41] The impressive entry list included ex-World Championship drivers Hannu Mikkola, Ari Vatanen (partnered by his 1981 WRC winning co-driver David Richards), Björn Waldegård, Stig Blomqvist, Malcolm Wilson, Russell Brookes, Jimmy McRae, Andrew Cowan and Louise Aitken-Walker, many competing in their original cars. A handful of current WRC drivers also took part including Matthew Wilson, Kris Meeke and Travis Pastrana. The event was deemed a great success, attracting record spectator numbers to the Perthshire forests. Outright winner was Stobart VK M-Sport Ford Rally Team driver Matthew Wilson in a Ford Focus WRC. Fittingly, Colin's brother Alister McRae won the classic category.
A Fatal Accident Inquiry into the incident concluded, on 6 September 2011, that McRae was at fault for the avoidable helicopter crash that led to his death and the death of his passengers.[43] Sheriff Nikola Stewart stated, after the 16-day inquiry, that McRae had been engaged in "unnecessary and unsafe" low-level flying at the time of the crash.[44][45]
A1GP ADAC Formel Masters Auto GP Barber Pro Formula Abarth FA1 Formula Alfa Formula Asia Formula BMW FC Euro Series Formula König Formula LGB Swift Hyundai Formula Lightning Formula Maruti Formula Masters China Russia Formula Nissan 3.5L Formula Opel/Vauxhall Formula Palmer Audi Formula RUS Formula Rolon Formula SCCA Grand Prix Masters GP2 GP3 International Formula Master Superleague Formula World Series Formula V8 3.5
These events were road races in all but name, but in Italy such races were still allowed, and the Mille Miglia continued until a serious accident in 1957 caused it to be banned.[43] Meanwhile, in 1981, the Tour de France was revived by the Automobile-Club de Nice as a different kind of rally, based primarily on a series of races at circuits and hillclimbs around the country.[44] It was successful for a while and continued until 1986. It spawned similar events in a few other countries, but none survive. 

A rally is caused by a significant increase in demand resulting from a large influx of investment capital into the market. This leads to the bidding up of prices. The length or magnitude of a rally depends on the depth of buyers along with the amount of selling pressure they face. For example, if there is a large pool of buyers but few investors willing to sell, there is likely to be a large rally. If, however, the same large pool of buyers is matched by a similar amount of sellers, the rally is likely to be short and the price movement minimal.

In Germany, the Herkomer Trophy was first held in 1905, and again in 1906. This challenging five-day event attracted over 100 entrants to tackle its 1,000 km (620 mi) road section, a hillclimb and a speed trial, but sadly it was marred by poor organisation and confusing regulations.[20] One participant had been Prince Henry of Austria, who was inspired to do better, so he enlisted the aid of the Imperial Automobile Club of Germany to create the first Prinz Heinrich Fahrt (Prince Henry Trial) in 1908. Another trial was held in 1910. These were very successful, attracting top drivers and works cars from major teams – several manufacturers added "Prince Henry" models to their ranges.[21] The first Alpine Trial was held in 1909, in Austria; by 1914, this was the toughest event of its kind, producing a star performance from Britain's James Radley in his Rolls-Royce Alpine Eagle.[22]


In countries where there was no shortage of demanding roads across remote terrain, other events sprang up. In South America, the biggest of these took the form of long distance city to city races, each of around 5,000 to 6,000 miles (8,000–9,500 km), divided into daily legs. The first was the Gran Premio del Norte of 1940, run from Buenos Aires to Lima and back; it was won by Juan Manuel Fangio in a much modified Chevrolet coupé.[48] This event was repeated in 1947, and in 1948 an even more ambitious one was held, the Gran Premio de la América del Sur from Buenos Aires to Caracas, Venezuela—Fangio had an accident in which his co-driver was killed.[49] Then in 1950 came the fast and dangerous Carrera Panamericana, a 1,911-mile (3,075 km) road race in stages across Mexico to celebrate the opening of the asphalt highway between the Guatemala and United States borders, which ran until 1954.[50] All these events fell victim to the cost – financial, social and environmental – of putting them on in an increasingly complex and developed world, although smaller road races continued long after, and a few still do in countries like Bolivia.

Codemasters released the first Colin McRae Rally video game in 1998. Version 2, known as Colin McRae Rally 2.0, was released in the year 2000, for Sony's PlayStation and Microsoft Windows; it was also ported to the Game Boy Advance in 2002. A third version found a wide audience on Windows and Xbox. Versions 04 and 2005 arrived in 2004 on all major platforms. 2005 was also remade for Sony's PlayStation Portable and Nokia's N-Gage.
In February 2015, The National Film & Television School in England premiered one of their graduating films called "Group B" directed by ex-rally driver Nick Rowland. The film, set during the last year of the Group B class of rally tells the story of a young driver having to face a difficult comeback after a 'long and troubled absence'. The young driver is played by Scottish actor Richard Madden, and his co-driver played by Northern Irish actor Michael Smiley.
The causes of rallies vary. Short-term rallies can result from news stories or events that create a short-term imbalance in supply and demand. Sizeable buying activity in a particular stock or sector by a large fund, or an introduction of a new product by a popular brand, can have a similar effect that results in a short-term rally. For example, almost every time Apple Inc. has launched a new iPhone, its stock has enjoyed a rally over the following months.
The raids triggered pro-immigrant protests across the country over the weekend, including a rally and march to ICE headquarters in Chicago on Saturday, CNN affiliate WLS reported. — Ray Sanchez, CNN, "Man accused of hurling incendiary devices at Washington ICE facility fatally shot by police," 13 July 2019 The gun control groups also sent squadrons of staffers to Richmond on Tuesday to help organize outdoor rallies and protests. — Washington Post, "The NRA is in turmoil. But in Virginia gun debate this week, the group flexed muscles," 12 July 2019 Julio Guerrero, of MKE Taco Truck Advocates, hosts the rallies and often organizes a political issue for attendees to engage with. — Sophie Carson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Milwaukee activists set up Nativity scene with Jesus behind fence to make statement about detained migrants," 12 July 2019 Now, a plan for a rally and vigil on Friday, July 12, has drawn widespread support, with more than 600 demonstrations planned on five continents. — Tovin Lapan, Fortune, "‘Lights for Liberty’ Vigil Reflects Growing Resistance to Immigrant Detention Policies," 11 July 2019 Vigils for immigrants: Numerous rallies and vigils are planned in the Bay Area and beyond in support of undocumented immigrants and in opposition to Trump administration policies. — SFChronicle.com, "Bay Area political events: Rallies for undocumented immigrants, naked bike ride," 11 July 2019 At least three right-wing groups, including the Proud Boys and the #HimToo group, and an antifa protesters held rallies or demonstrations, CBS Portland affiliate KOIN reports. — CBS News, "Clashes between right-wing demonstrations and antifa turn into civil disturbance in Portland," 30 June 2019 In a later press conference, Mr. Wong said there would be more rallies and protests before the G-20 summit in Japan next week and the July 1 anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to Chinese sovereignty. — Natasha Khan, WSJ, "Hong Kong Leader Carrie Lam Makes Apology, Puts Contested Law On Ice," 18 June 2019 From parades and parties to rallies and wellness activities, options are literally endless. — Metanoya Z. Webb, Essence, "Happy Pride! 20 LGBTQ Travel Destinations Where It's Safe to be Queer, Black and Proud," 11 June 2019
In countries where there was no shortage of demanding roads across remote terrain, other events sprang up. In South America, the biggest of these took the form of long distance city to city races, each of around 5,000 to 6,000 miles (8,000–9,500 km), divided into daily legs. The first was the Gran Premio del Norte of 1940, run from Buenos Aires to Lima and back; it was won by Juan Manuel Fangio in a much modified Chevrolet coupé.[48] This event was repeated in 1947, and in 1948 an even more ambitious one was held, the Gran Premio de la América del Sur from Buenos Aires to Caracas, Venezuela—Fangio had an accident in which his co-driver was killed.[49] Then in 1950 came the fast and dangerous Carrera Panamericana, a 1,911-mile (3,075 km) road race in stages across Mexico to celebrate the opening of the asphalt highway between the Guatemala and United States borders, which ran until 1954.[50] All these events fell victim to the cost – financial, social and environmental – of putting them on in an increasingly complex and developed world, although smaller road races continued long after, and a few still do in countries like Bolivia.
Anyone who has ever played Sega Rally 2 will instantly be familiar with this car. Mäkinen won his fourth consecutive WRC title in a red Evo VI, and this car was commissioned as a road-going replica to celebrate that fact. The Tommi special was fitted with a faster-responding titanium turbo, lower suspension, a front strut brace, and quicker steering. The car made 280hp and hit 60mph in 4.5 seconds.

“Ask anyone to name a rally driver and the first name that comes to mind is invariably Colin McRae,” said Silverstone’s Adam Rutter. “He was always a favourite among rally fans but his incredible success also made him a household name.” The auction house expects this very Focus to sell for between £120,000 and £140,000, or about $170-200k when the gavel drops on February 23.

Other rallies provide organizer-created "route notes" also referred to as "stage notes" and disallow reconnaissance and use of other pacenotes. These notes are usually created using a predetermined pacenote format, from which a co-driver can optionally add comments or transpose into other pacenote notations. Many North American rallies do not conduct reconnaissance but provide stage notes through the use of the Jemba Inertia Notes System, due to time and budget constraints.[63]

RallyCarsForSale is very secure with your personal data. We do NOT publish YOUR  e-mail addresses directly on the website. Still our users report getting scam e-mail’s. In most cases you can recognize scammers because they show no real knowledge, ask strongly formulated phony questions and are willing to pay the asking price directly without any more information. 

In many rallies, including those of the World Rally Championship (WRC), drivers are allowed to run on the stages of the course before competition and create their own pacenotes. This process is called reconnaissance or recce. During reconnaissance, the co-driver writes down shorthand notes (the pacenotes) on how to best drive the stage. Usually the drivers call out the turns and road conditions for the co-drivers to write down. These pacenotes are read aloud through an internal intercom system during the actual race, allowing the driver to anticipate the upcoming terrain and thus take the course as fast as possible.
In Britain, the legal maximum speed of 12 mph (19 km/h) precluded road racing, but in April and May 1900, the Automobile Club of Great Britain (the forerunner of the Royal Automobile Club) organised the Thousand Mile Trial, a 15-day event linking Britain's major cities, in order to promote this novel form of transport. Seventy vehicles took part, the majority of them trade entries. They had to complete thirteen stages of route varying in length from 43 to 123 miles (69 to 198 km) at average speeds of up to the legal limit of 12 mph (19 km/h), and tackle six hillclimb or speed tests. On rest days and at lunch halts, the cars were shown to the public in exhibition halls.[14][unreliable source?] This was followed in 1901 by a five-day trial based in Glasgow[15] The Scottish Automobile Club organised an annual Glasgow–London non-stop trial from 1902 to 1904, then the Scottish Reliability Trial from 1905.[16] The Motor Cycling Club allowed cars to enter its trials and runs from 1904 (London–Edinburgh, London–Land's End, London–Exeter—all still in being as mud-plugging classic trials).[16] In 1908 the Royal Automobile Club held its 2,000 mi (3,200 km) International Touring Car Trial,[17] and 1914 the important Light Car Trial for manufacturers of cars up to 1400 cc, to test comparative performances and improve the breed.[18] In 1924, the exercise was repeated as the Small Car Trials.[19]

However, if you are heading for a spin around your favourite backcountry twister, then there are few cars better suited. Independent suspension all-round, a turbocharged 230hp 2.0-litre engine and all-wheel drive, mixed with the early signs of Ford’s newfound commitment to handling, meant the Cosworth would devour pretty much any flavour of road in its path.


Categories: 1968 births2007 deaths24 Hours of Le Mans driversAviators killed in aviation accidents or incidents in ScotlandBritish Touring Car Championship driversMembers of the Order of the British EmpireScottish aviatorsScottish rally driversScottish racing driversScottish Sports Hall of Fame inducteesScottish expatriates in MonacoSegrave Trophy recipientsVictims of helicopter accidents or incidentsScottish Rally ChampionshipWorld Rally ChampionsWorld Rally Championship driversWorld Rally Championship peopleX Games athletesFatal accident inquiriesPorsche Supercup driversSportspeople from LanarkPeople educated at Lanark Grammar SchoolASCAR driversPorsche Carrera Cup GB drivers


As public interest grew, car companies started to introduce special models or variants for rallying, such as the British Motor Corporation's highly successful Mini Cooper, introduced in 1962, and its successor the Mini Cooper S (1963), developed by the Cooper Car Company. Shortly after, Ford of Britain first hired Lotus to create a high-performance version of their Cortina family car, then in 1968 launched the Escort Twin Cam, one of the most successful rally cars of its era.[61] Similarly, Abarth developed high performance versions of Fiats 124 roadster and 131 saloon.
You might think a delicate French car built for comfort and comfort alone doesn't belong in rally, but you'd be wrong. The Citroën DS' hydraulic suspension, designed to iron out bumps on the road, worked beautifully on rough rally stages. It won the Monte Carlo Rally in 1959 and 1966 and was competitive up until the mid-1970s, just as DS production ended. Pretty good for a big, temperamental luxury car.
In the past, most rally courses were not allowed to be scanned prior to the race, and the co-drivers used only maps supplied by the organization. The exact route of the rally often remained secret until race day. Modern rallies have mostly converted to using organizer-supplied notes or allowing full reconnaissance, as opposed to racing the stages blindly. This change has been brought on in large part due to competitor demand.
Rising investor confidence also indicates a rally, and it is perhaps more powerful than any economic indicator because when investors believe something is going to happen (a rally, for example), they tend to take action (purchasing shares in order to profit from expected price increases) that actually turn expectations into reality. Although it is an objective concept, investor sentiment shows through in mathematical measurements such as the put/call ratio, the advance/decline line, IPO activity, and the amount of outstanding margin debt. 

In many rallies, including those of the World Rally Championship (WRC), drivers are allowed to run on the stages of the course before competition and create their own pacenotes. This process is called reconnaissance or recce. During reconnaissance, the co-driver writes down shorthand notes (the pacenotes) on how to best drive the stage. Usually the drivers call out the turns and road conditions for the co-drivers to write down. These pacenotes are read aloud through an internal intercom system during the actual race, allowing the driver to anticipate the upcoming terrain and thus take the course as fast as possible.
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